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Girlpool

Band                : Girlpool

Album             : What Chaos Is Imaginary

VÖ                  : 01.02.2019

Label               : ANTI- / Indigo

Website           : http://www.girlpoolmusic.com/

Never before has a group's maturation been so transparently attached to the maturation of its members. This is due in large part to the fact that Girlpool came into existence exactly when Girlpool was supposed to come into existence: at the most prolific stage of the digital revolution. Both online and in the flesh, Tividad and Tucker practice radical openness to the point where it may even engender discomfort; this is exactly the point where it becomes clear why theirs' is such a special project: they accept the possibility of discomfort-Chaos-and show you how to figure out why you might feel it. This is achieved through their ability to empathize as best friends and partners in creation, with the intention of making music that provokes.

They met in November of 2013, and released their self-titled EP just 3 months later. Both were playing in multiple bands at the time. Harmony was 18. Cleo was 17.

The growth they have fostered in one another over the years explains the project's disparate discography; each record is a photograph of Girlpool, growing over time. Their roots are a certain shade of punk-organized chaos dressed as earworms. "Where You Sink," one of the first singles off their upcoming record, What Chaos Is Imaginary, gives you an idea of how much things have changed since 2014.

It's not all good.
"I was experiencing a lot of mental health issues," says Tividad of the title. "That song comes from a place of being disconnected from reality. The world is so complicated. It's hard to believe in magic, or that anything exists." Notice the order: magic, then the principle existence of things. A peak into Harmony.

Though it is the 3rd track on Girlpool's newest record, "Where You Sink" was written at a time when the two were living in different states on the East Coast. It proved to be a period of immense change for the both of them; each focused-more than they ever had before-on their solo music.

"Before, we would build our songs together with four hands, from the ground up," says Tucker, referring to the songwriting process that produced the debut EP and 2015's critically acclaimed follow-up, Before The World Was Big. "Our songs used to be intertwined in a different way. We brought our separate experiences to the songs that we crafted together, we valued understanding that they were multidimensional."

Their solo work consistently breathes new life into Girlpool. The two have since become comfortable with the process being more independent, more fluid. They both take part in the production and arrangement of the music, but they've strayed from beginning hand in hand in every instance. They connect somewhere along the way, working together when it feels right.

Discussing the new process, Harmony says, "It's helped me find validity in parts of my writing I found to be unapproachable. I thought my stream-of-consciousness was unsophisticated." There's probably a great pun available re: shedding self-consciousness to release a more sophisticated stream-of-consciousness. In any case, What Chaos is Imaginary-the record and the song-is what the stream looks like when self-consciousness is shed.

Where Harmony embraces chaos, Cleo organizes it. "It's hard for me to feel completion without achieving a vision that I have. I'll imagine the kind of climate I want to create inside a song," says Cleo of his process. "Once I fall in love with the direction, it's getting there that can take time." Finishing a song may take time and even prove to be difficult for him at times, but the product is invariably polished. Considering the near-perfect balance in the songs on What Chaos is Imaginary, their dynamic makes sense. "It took a really long time to record this record. It feels like a photograph of a very transitional time."

What Chaos is Imaginary is a collection of songs unlike any Girlpool songs you've ever heard, exactly what Powerplant was to Before The World Was Big. For the first time, it is clear who wrote what song. 2019 will see drum machines and synthesizers and beautiful/new harmonies and huge guitars and at least one orchestral breakdown by a string octet.

"It was invigorating playing stripped down and raw when Girlpool began. As we change, what gets us there is going to change too."

It's hard to imagine what might follow What Chaos is Imaginary. Girlpool's growth has a steady momentum forward, towards something greater with every stride that they take. By the time the record comes out, they'll be far from here, wherever here is.

 

Infos zum alten Album:

Band: GIRLPOOL

Album: Powerplant

VÖ: 12.05.2017

Label: Anti- / Indigo

Website: https://www.facebook.com/GIRLPOOOL/

Life has been a whirl for Girlpool since the release of their acclaimed 2015 debut Before the World Was Big. Shortly before the record came out, Harmony Tividad (she/her) and Cleo Tucker (they/them) relocated from their hometown of Los Angeles all the way across the country to Philadelphia, where they quickly became embedded in the local D.I.Y. scene. "Before BTWWB, I was just out of high school, living in my old neighborhood," recalls Cleo Tucker. "Then we started touring in a way we'd never done before. I really started to experience the duality that was beginning to exist in my life: tour/not on tour." After a chaotic and informative year spent floating around the East Coast, both bandmates moved home to California at the start of 2017. Girlpool have been seemingly everywhere at once, exploring all the world's offerings with open minds and notebooks. All the lessons they learned, about the earth and about themselves, are gathered together in their sophomore record and ANTI- debut, Powerplant.

Over 10 days in August 2016, Girlpool holed up at Los Angeles' Comp-ny studios to record and mix Powerplant with Drew Fischer. For the first time, Harmony and Cleo were joined by a third performer, drummer Miles Wintner, a friend who easily meshed with the tightknit duo. The decision to add percussion came as a natural decision for Harmony and Cleo; "Cleo and I just were driving down the New Jersey turnpike when she mentioned that it might be exciting to expand our sound for the new songs," says Harmony. "The songs we were writing had the potential of getting really climactic," adds Cleo. "I think percussion adds a new part of the musical dynamic that we want to explore."Girlpool's eagerness to evolve should come as no surprise; in the same way that there were little traces of their self-titled EP on BTWWB, on Powerplant, the pair shed their old skins with more eagerness than before. "In some ways I feel more courageous and mature and in other ways I feel smaller and softer, sometimes even more fragile than ever," says Harmony, adding that while the inner self is always changing, ultimately the end is a closer self-truth.

The 12 tracks that compose Powerplant grow and burn with greater fire than the duo have possessed heretofore. Both bandmates were heavily inspired by Elliott Smith, the Cranberries, the Cocteau Twins, Brian Eno, Arthur Russell, and Graham Nash; the influence of each appear in the record's deliberate and intricate guitar work ("Fast Dust," "She Goes By") as well as its embrace of dissonant noise ("Corner Store," "Soup"). Though they were living apart for most of the writing process, the pair still managed to write all but four songs together, another testament to their dedication to Girlpool and each other. Now 21 and 20, Harmony and Cleo confront projections, despondency, apathy, romanticization, love, and heartbreak with a more devastating emotional pragmatism than before. "Looking pretty at the wall is my mistake in love installed/While the moth doesn't talk but in the dress the holes you saw," they sing on opener "123," perfectly refracting the truth. More humorous (but still heavily symbolic) lines are delivered with equal poignancy, like Harmony's disclaimer on "It Gets More Blue," "The nihilist tells you that nothing is true/I said I faked global warming just to get close to you."

Both bandmates believe that radical vulnerability and honesty are essential to discovering oneself. "I see vulnerable softness as a place where the honest self can come forward," Cleo explains, saying that on Powerplant, Girlpool aimed for sincere expression. "As a society I feel that we perceive softness and vulnerability as traits that are 'weak,' and people emotionally disconnect themselves in order to avoid going through everything they feel," Harmony adds. "I think what is most important right now is empathy, and in order to have empathy we must first feel what we, ourselves, feel." Perhaps what really makes Powerplant a home run is that Girlpool understand exactly how to use their incisive lyrics, soft textures, hushed harmonies, and soaring hooks for maximum emotional impact. In these moments, when Harmony and Cleo's voices join together to deliver transcendent transmissions straight from their hearts, Girlpool become a league of their own.

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